The Growing 9/11 Drone Army

February 20, 2012

Army Sees 11,000% Increase in US Army Drone Arsenal Over Last 10 Years Since: New Legislation Paves Way for 30,000 More Above the USA

Brian Romanoff       Nor Cal Truth     Feb 20, 2012

Never let it be said that the military industrial complex does not heavily rely on 9/11 to continue and thrive.

In October of 2001 the US Army had about 54 drones in its arsenal, however that would change soon after the attacks of 9/11. Some numbers are noted by the Scientific American:

The U.S. Army’s drone armada alone has expanded from 54 drones in October 2001, when U.S. combat operations began in Afghanistan, to more than 4,000 drones performing surveillance, reconnaissance and attack missions in Afghanistan, Iraq and Pakistan (pdf).

There are more than 6,000 of them throughout the U.S. military as a whole, and continued developments promise to make these controversial aircraft—blamed for the deaths of militants as well as citizens—far more intelligent and nimble.

From 54 drones in 2001 to the current 6,000 in-stock, within 10 years of 9/11 the US Army saw a net increase of their drone arsenal by 11,000%.

That was then. This is now:

new law signed by Obama last week, HR 658,  is set to increase the amount of drones in the skies over the USA.  The Washington Times has this:

The legislation would order the FAA, before the end of the year, to expedite the process through which it authorizes the use of drones by federal, state and local police and other agencies.

Section 332 of the new FAA legislation also orders the agency to develop a system for licensing commercial drone flights as part of the nation’s air traffic control system by 2015.

The provision in the legislation is the fruit of “a huge push by lawmakers and the defense sector to expand the use of drones” in American airspace, she added.

The agency projects that 30,000 drones could be in the nation’s skies by 2020.

Business Insider points out important facts to remember:

This new bill follows up the Army’s January directive to use  drone fleets in the U.S. for training missions and “domestic  operations.”

And both of these initiatives are mandated in the NDAA  (section 1097) that calls for six drone test ranges to be operational within six  months of that bills signing December 31.

The commercial drone market would be worth hundreds of millions more  if the bill passes.

Northrop Grumman, Raytheon, Lockheed Martin and many other ‘Corporate Partners‘ are poised to profit heavily from the legislation. They are the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International or AUVSI, a conglomerate of ‘defense’ companies that essentially lobbied for and drafted HR 658.

Republic Report highlights the fact that AUVSI doubled its lobbying expenses last year:

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Rise of the Drones – UAVs After 9/11

October 4, 2011

by Randy Roughton    source: Armed with Science    Oct 4, 2011

Hummingbird drones fly at 11 mph and can perch on windowsills. The 3-foot-long Raven can be tossed into the air like a model airplane to spy over the next hill in Afghanistan. The Air Force’s new Gorgon Stare aerial drone sensor technology can capture live video of an entire city. From the RQ-4 Global Hawk and MQ-1 Predator to considerably smaller aerial drones in recent years, the Air Force has experienced an unmanned aircraft revolution in the decade since Sept. 11, 2001.

….

Long before 9/11, former Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. John P. Jumper, then U.S. Air Forces in Europe commander, envisioned giving unmanned aerial vehicles offensive capability that would allow immediate action when their surveillance cameras spotted high-value targets. In 1999, RQ-1 Predators flew over Kosovo 24 hours per day in surveillance of hostile forces.

Almost seven months before 9/11, a Predator successfully fired a Hellfire missile in flight near Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. The same Predator was among the first three UAVs to deploy overseas on Sept. 12, 2001. By the height of Operation Iraqi Freedom in 2005, Jumper told Congress he wanted to buy every Predator the General Atomics Aeronautical Systems in San Diego could build, and the Air Force announced it would buy 144 Predators and increase the squadrons of robotic spy planes from three to 12 in the next five years.

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9/11 Heroes In Life-Struggle As Obama Signs Multi-Billion War Bill

December 24, 2009

source: 9/11 Blogger,   Jon Gold


Congress Passes $636 Billion in Military Spending

December 19, 2009

excerpts from: Raw Story

In a rare weekend vote, the Senate approved the 636.3-billion-dollar package, which cleared the House of Representatives 395-34 on Wednesday, by an 88-10 margin.

Obama is expected to send Congress an emergency spending measure of at least 30 billion dollars early next year to pay for his recently announced decision to send 30,000 more US troops to Afghanistan.

The bill includes 80 million dollars to acquire more unmanned “Predator” drones, a key tool in the US air war in Afghanistan and Pakistan.

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Pre-9/11 Movies – Additions to the 9/11 Timeline as of December 15, 2009

December 17, 2009

source: History Commons

Three entries recently published in the 9/11 Timeline cover films with 9/11-style themes made before the attacks. 1977’s Black Sunday had terrorists crashing an explosive-laden blimp into the Superbowl stadium, 1996’s Executive Decision featured a planned suicide attack with a commercial jet, and a late 2001 Chuck Norris vehicle originally entitled The President’s Man: Ground Zero was too close to real events for comfort and CBS refused to air it.

Elsewhere, al-Qaeda second-in-command Ayman al-Zawahiri was unsurprisingly unimpressed with Barrack Obama, two of the 9/11 hijackers asked a neighbour for their towel back shortly before the attacks, and some of the 2006 “liquid bomb” plotters were convicted in Britain in September, although others were acquitted. Their alleged leader Rashid Rauf was hit by a drone last year, although doubts about his death persist.

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Drones, Cowboys and the Right to Surrender

December 11, 2009

featured stories   Drones, Cowboys and the Right to Surrender

From the military perspective, drone warfare is really cool, make that really really cool.

Source: InfoWars

Joni Dahlstrom
Infowars
December 11, 2009

Sci Fi warfare isn’t coming to our future, it is here. And there will be consequences for every human on the planet. A new battlefield has been created, one in which the odds are tipped decidedly in favor of technological prowess over and above humanity.

Witness the recent announcement that yet another Al Qaida Number Three Man, the fifth Number Three, has been eliminated in Pakistan by a drone attack. Eliminate is an interesting word. In military operations, it is impolitic and impolite to use words like kill and murder against enemy forces, thus we don’t kill people, but eliminate or take out Al Qaida. People don’t die, they are merely deadly enemy combatants removed from the gaming field. There is no war here, no human cost, no violation of due process, violation of allied air space, just a surgical strike upon a target. In the words of Officer Barbrady, “Move along, nothing to see here.” Read the rest of this entry »


Obama Expands CIA Drone Attacks in Pakistan

December 5, 2009

source: CNN

(Washington) – The White House has authorized an expansion of the CIA’s program to attack suspected al Qaeda and Taliban operatives in Pakistan along the Pakistan-Afghanistan border with missiles shot from pilotless planes, a U.S. official confirms.

The covert effort is part of the Obama administration’s plan to increase the number of U.S. military forces in Afghanistan and crack down on suspected terrorists in the region.

Since President Obama took office, there have been reports of more than 40 attacks by Hellfire missiles fired from drones, an increase over the approximately 30 missile strikes launched in 2008 during the Bush administration.

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